Author Topic: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986  (Read 25031 times)

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #50 on: May 28, 2016, 05:13:19 PM »
His Satanic life philosophy ties in with his albums.











"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline TheUnborn

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #51 on: June 03, 2016, 12:57:35 PM »
His Satanic life philosophy ties in with his albums.

Absolutely, but I'm quite sure He wants to talk about the albums as well, not only the philosophy.
He's a gentleman and answers thoroughly on all questions, though, no matter what. A perfect artist to interview.

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #52 on: June 19, 2016, 05:41:59 PM »
The painted Mercyful Fate frontman gives us the lowdown on how he lives his life
Ever since he made his mark in the early '80s with Mercyful Fate, King Diamond has been a massively influential figure on the extreme metal scene. Danish born but now a resident of Texas, his musical and visual approach, both as a member of this band also as a solo performer, has been striking and original. But away from the glare of fame and the expectations of his fans, what drives the real King Diamond? As he prepares to play an eagerly awaited show at The Forum in London on June 21, we get his guide to life.
Music
“I listen to a lot of old stuff still. I have a huge number of CDs, and some of these are very rare. I have them on labels which don't even exist any more. One thing I don't have, though, is a turntable; I haven't owned one for years. But I do have some special albums on vinyl. For instance, I have the one album put out by Captain Beyond in 1972, with a 3D sleeve. I also have Physical Graffiti from Led Zeppelin in an original pressing, with the cut-out sleeve, and I have a copy of Zeppelin's Houses Of The Holy with an embossed sleeve. Then, there's Sabbath Bloody Sabbath from Black Sabbath with lyrics – and that's the only way I found out that Rick Wakeman played keyboards on that record!
“I listen to new albums put out by people I know, and I still go back to my Uriah Heep albums. Their original singer David Byron is my all time favourite vocalist!
“I am lucky now to have superb speaker systems throughout my house. These are so good that I can now listen to albums I thought I knew and hear things which were hidden from me before. That's great – to be able to go back to an album I thought I knew so well and hear it in a different way.”
Politics
“I never talk openly about my political beliefs. I am an entertainer, and don't believe I should use this position to preach to anyone about who they should be voting for. Others might disagree, but that's the way I feel.
“I am eligible to vote in the upcoming US Presidential election, but I won't, because there isn't a candidate who represents what I want. In Denmark, you have 13 or more political parties, so it's not too difficult to find a party who reflect your views. Coalitions happen all the time, and there's a decent percentage that will be represented. In America, though, it's a two party system, and that's bad because they spend much of the time disagreeing with each other for the sake of casing arguments. If one patty suggests doing something, you know the other will automatically argue against that. So, what chance is there for a reasonable representation?
“All I would say to people is that they should read as much as they can about candidates, find out what they can, then make make up their own minds.”

Religion
“People still ask me if I am a Satanist. Absolutely, although that depends on how you define Satanism, and one thing I have never done is join any Satanic church. I have my own beliefs. However, as with politics, I don't tell anyone what they should believe – I don't preach. Everyone has to come to their own conclusion which god they want to believe in – if they believe there is a god at all.

“However, I am very spiritual, and believe that when I am dead, I will be reunited somewhere with my parents and other loved ones. What I do say to those who believe in God is if there is a God, why doesn't show himself to everyone, instead of letting every religion feel they have the only path to him, and have a right to disrespect all other religions?”

TV
“I watch a lot of sport on TV, but very little else. I did see the recent series The Man In The High Castle and enjoyed that a lot. And I do occasionally catch interesting documentaries on TV. But, in all honesty, I don't find much to interest me – too many channels with too little quality. However, I am looking forward to the new series of Game Of Thrones. Yes, that is brutal and bloody, but then again that's what appeals to me.”

SPEND TIME WITH PETS
I've had cats ever since I moved to America. At one time, I had a black cat called Magic, and another one called Ghost, who was all white. Now I have two cats who were born within a couple of weeks of each other. They were so tiny as kittens. When we got them their names were Hans and Benji, and we've decided to keep on those names, rather than change them to anything exotic. Whenever I go on tour I really miss the cats. And if my wife is with me, then we have to make arrangements for her father to go over and looking the guys. They mean a lot to me.

Short piece from interview with Richard Christy
JG: You also enjoy touring cemeteries. Do you have a list of your favorites? Do you prefer the large ones with the stately mausoleums and headstones and famous residents or the smaller, unknown ones that are run down and rarely visited?

RC: I love both. I go running at Calvary Cemetery in Queens, NY, a lot in the fall and I listen to King Diamond while I do it. “At The Graves” and “Sleepless Nights” are the perfect songs to listen to while running in a cemetery! I really love the cemetery in Salem, it is beautiful and has some amazing trees that are very colorful in the fall. I’ve visited Jim Morrison’s grave in Paris, France and it’s one of the most beautiful cemeteries I’ve ever visited. New Orleans also has some of the most amazing cemeteries I’ve ever visited. My dream home would be a gothic house right next to a cemetery!

« Last Edit: June 22, 2016, 08:49:42 PM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #53 on: June 19, 2016, 05:42:55 PM »
He inspired Metallica, annoyed Gene Simmons and took rock for a walk on the dark side. These are the devilish life and diabolical times of King Diamond
February 1984. It’s a freezing night in Copenhagen, Denmark. Under heavy snow, the streets are silent. In a rooftop apartment, something weird is going down.

King Diamond, the singer with Danish heavy metal band Mercyful Fate, is entertaining four guests: Timi Hansen, the band’s bassist, and his girlfriend, and Metallica's Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield, who are in Copenhagen to record their group’s second album, Ride The Lightning. It’s been a long night, and all of them are drunk. For hours they’ve been sitting in the living room, talking and soaking up the heavy vibes from old records by Deep Purple, Black Sabbath and Blue Öyster Cult. In one corner of the room is an altar: a table draped in a black cloth, lit by tall candles and decorated with a figurine of the pagan idol Baphomet and occult books The Satanic Bible and The Necronomicon, the centerpiece a human skull.

King Diamond is an avowed Satanist. His obsession with the dark arts is expressed in Mercyful Fate’s songs and in his theatrical image: his face painted white and black, like Kiss, but with an inverted cross between his eyes. This occult shtick is of no interest to Hetfield and Ulrich, they just like the guy and love his band. But what is about to happens on this night at King’s place scares the shit out of Hansen and his girlfriend.

“I remember it clearly,” King Diamond says now, 32 years on. “At one point we left Timi and the girl alone in the living room, to have some fun. Lars and James and I went to my bedroom to play a game of table football. And then we heard a gigantic bang. I rushed back into the living room and both Timi and the girl were sitting there with faces white as sheets. Everything from my altar was spread across the floor. Timi said he’d felt himself being lifted up and thrown back down.

“I said: ‘It’s them. Don’t worry.’ I put the things back, and it was fine. But then the girl went off to the bathroom. After a while we could hear her crying in there. And then she screamed out: ‘Something’s growling at me! I can’t get out – the door’s locked!’ I took the handle and opened the door. She was sitting there in tears, dumbstruck.”

As King remembers it, Lars and James were too drunk to really absorb what had happened. But he was certain. “It was a visitation,” he says. “You could hear how they left – out through the bathroom window.” And he claims it was one of many such occurrences. “There were other experiences I had in that place. I remember once I felt a touch on my cheek… That place was haunted. So many people experienced stuff in there, not just me.

“In my life I’ve seen a lot of things,” he says. “Supernatural things. I’ve seen the place between heaven and hell.”

King Diamond appeared as much a caricature as any of them. With his masked face and satanic songs rendered in that mock-operatic shriek, he was frequently ridiculed in the music press. And yet there was something that set him and Mercyful Fate apart from bands such as Venom and Slayer, who posed as Satanists purely for shock value. King Diamond was entirely serious about this stuff. He was a scholar in the dark arts, and a member of the Church Of Satan, the organisation led by Anton Szandor LaVey, author of The Satanic Bible. And in Mercyful Fate’s music there was a depth and power that went far beyond the primitive bludgeoning of Venom and early Slayer. The band’s style of complex, heavy riffing was an inspiration to James Hetfield, who has stated that “Mercyful Fate was a huge influence on Metallica”./

That is the first time they mentioned he had the Baphomet symbol hanging above  his altar instead of the inverted cross. Also first time it was mention King included the Necronomicon on his altar. Did not know he used that book in ritual

Did you ever meet Anton LaVey?

Yes. I will never forget that experience. After a show in San Francisco I was invited by a couple of witches who were at the show to come meet him. We drove to The Church and I spent the whole night there. He invited me to the ritual chamber and he had these big dobermans guarding the hallway. He told me, “You probably shouldn’t pet them because I don’t know what they’ll do.” He was unlocking the door and I had to pet one of the dogs. I did that and LaVey looked and said, “Ah, good vibrations.” So we walked in there and I told him that if it was OK, I’d like to speak first and tell him what I feel about the world rather than him talking to me and me standing there nodding. This way he could get a judgment, too. When I was done, he took off the devil symbol pin he was wearing and pressed it into my hand. When we came out, he played keyboards for me. He had a lot of keyboards. He started playing this happy song, singing, “Wonderful wonderful Copenhagen” with a smirk on his face. That’s where I’m from. We took a couple of pictures and kept in touch afterwards. I have a hand-written letter from him that I always take on tour.

Were you ever an active member of The Church of Satan?
LaVey gave me eternal membership.


That was nice.

It’s not like I keep in contact. I don’t need to keep in contact to live my life. I don’t live according to any rules. Because when I first read the Satanic Bible, the book of life philosophy I would call it, it was like reading about the way I have always felt; the way I live my life already. I wouldn’t say I’m active in the church. I think it’s great that some people do it, but I don’t have the time. It was an experience being there and seeing the Iron Maidens for the doorways, the secret doors—LaVey could always enter a room without you seeing him.

The apartment I lived in in Denmark was very haunted. Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield were there—I don’t remember if they were recording Ride the Lightning or Master of Puppets; but they were recording in Copenhagen. I had an altar in the apartment, and we were drinking and playing foosball in my room. This girl was there and she was crying in the bathroom after being in there for like 20 minutes. I opened the door and she was crying, “I couldn’t get out!” I said, “Why didn’t you just turn the door knob?” She said, “I couldn’t get up and this thing was growling in my face!” I said, “Oh. OK.” And then one time this girl was over and she was talking shit about, “Why do you have these things about ghosts and demons, these ridiculous things?” She was pissed. I said, “If you don’t believe in these things, we don’t have to talk about it. I don’t really care. But youbetter beware, or you might experience it yourself.” She said, “Whatever.” So I asked, “Do you want to try to see if we can bring something?” She said “Yeah, let’s do it.” To create the right atmosphere I put The Exorcist soundtrack on and then I said “If you are there, please come and show this girl.” It took five minutes, and then she started screaming while sitting on the couch—I could see her hair being pulled by nothing. We could hear hands scratching the walls and she was freaking out. It took two deep breathes by my altar. But I could hear the sound moving out to the hallway, and then it was gone. I was there with my brother one time having a beer, and a pint of beer lifted up off the table two feet, and then it slowly lowered back to the table. I took that as a sort of wish of good luck. It doesn’t matter if someone believes or doesn’t, it’s there.



« Last Edit: June 25, 2016, 09:13:07 PM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #54 on: July 28, 2016, 06:11:09 AM »
Is  King a  LaVeyan Satanist  and Spiritual Satanist since Satan to him stands for spiritual powers? Because  Church of Satan High Priest Gilmore says Satanic ritual is theatrical psychodrama only and that LaVeyans deny all things supernatural and spiritual  including  magic and spells and getting results.

King said he wants us to know about these powers so we can use them to have a better way of life but he does not say what he means by that or how one is suppose to go about using them to have a better life.

What did he mean about how people who see  satanism from a christian view do not treat the powers with respect?  How does King treat them with respect, what does he do as far as treating with respect?

He also said in an interview he does not believe in good and bad spirits but in another interview he said he summoned a bad spirit that ruined the Girlschool concert.

On Abigail 2 King says Jonathan has a twisted mind for believing Abigail is a reincarnated version of Miriam. So is King saying his personal beliefs in reincarnation are twisted?

And why do these powers allow such evil too happen in this world? Maybe that is why King warns about these powers and spirits so much as they are pure evil!

Plus he says the after life is a world with no more pain but that we come back here to the world of pain so that sucks. And if he is right then how does he expect to see his parents again on the other side if they like all of us have to come back here? And on Abigail 2 he says the spirits cross over to rest in peace and never die again, yet he says we all come back and die many times?

Some Satanists who do believe in spirits say it is important to command them. Not ask but demand they do your will

Plus as mentioned earlier with other questions  I do not want to spend eternity in a place  where I would need to experience horrible things like being raped or tortured or something in order to go there as King says he believes that is how it is.   Although Kings spiritual beliefs are not unique as many people believe as he does about living many lives and stuff. Mostly thanks to those famous "Seth" books that came out years ago which also made what is now called the law of attraction so famous.

I have always been open to spiritual things and have had experiences but science seems to always explain these things away. I have heard many shows where they explain how out of body experiences are a chemical reaction in the brain which explains the light, the floating out of the body, the tunnel, seeing dead loved ones, having a life review, etc. They even explain how before people die they think they see dead relatives or pets being there which ends up being due to a certain part of the brain being the one part that is still very active when a person is near death.  So it seems like all spiritual experiences are all  in the mind.

Guess that explains why whenever I have used the Ouija Board or done other things that are "Guaranteed" to attract the supernatural nothing has ever happened

Here is a link to an interview where King talks about meeting LaVey and the time he summoned a spirit to prove they were real to a girl who did not believe in them.

http://www.slapmagazine.com/articles/full/king-diamond

« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 08:51:07 AM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #55 on: September 12, 2016, 10:54:58 AM »
King Diamond - A normal neighbor!
JOHN CHRISTIAN·THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2016
Did you know? Death metal band King Diamond lives in Dallas ‘burbs?
Spooky? Maybe. The front man for death metal band King Diamond sound-proofed his music studio in his Frisco home so as to not bother the neighbors.
Satanic rock legend King Diamond puts on his menacing makeup, grabs his human femur bone mike stand and begins to howl, he’s the most sinister dude in heavy metal. But when he goes home to suburban Frisco, he’s just another friendly, middle-aged guy power-walking through the neighborhood. “It’s all very normal. The neighbors know who I am and they say ‘Hi’ when I’m out walking,” says the 58-year-old falsetto-voiced singer of “Evil,” “Burn” and “Satan’s Fall.” “I feel the Southern hospitality big-time in Dallas,” he says. “People are just so polite and helpful, which is one reason I love Texas. It’s not like that at all in Denmark.”

Born Kim Bendix Petersen in Copenhagen, the King Diamond front man took his early inspiration from Alice Cooper, Robert Plant and the occult. The King became infamous in the mid-’80’s by happenstance when Tipper Gore and the Parents Music Resource Center denounced his band Mercyful Fate and listed their occult-themed “Into the Coven” as a “Filthy Fifteen” song alongside ones by Prince, Madonna and Black Sabbath. “The first time I saw that list in USA Today, I said ‘This is great!’, ” he says in an interview before his upcoming Thursday gig at House of Blues. “Instead of shutting us down, they gave us more promotion and publicity.” As King Diamond’s cult status grew, he went solo and was befriended by Metallica, who played his songs onstage and even made King a character in the Guitar Hero game. In 1993, he quietly moved to suburban Dallas, where his then-wife was living. And he quickly settled into the area, attending FC Dallas soccer games and races at Texas Motor Speedway while mostly keeping a low profile. But four years ago, the singer’s world was turned upside down when he was rushed to the hospital after a series of heart attacks.

Triple-bypass surgery gave him a new lease on life: With help from his current wife, Hungarian-born singer Livia Zita, he stopped smoking and totally changed his diet. “I do miss ice cream and the greasy sauces, but the healthy fresh food I eat now tastes awesome,” he says, singling out Plano’s Seasons 52 as his favorite local restaurant. “And since I’ve stopped smoking, my voice is stronger. You can’t even say I’ve gotten my voice back, because it’s better than it ever was when I was smoking.”He’s become an avid exerciser, power-walking with his wife through Frisco five days a week when he’s not on tour. He’s also built a recording studio in their home and made sure it was sound-proofed so his high-decibel shrieks don’t prompt 911 calls. “We don’t want neighbors thinking there’s a murder going on next door,” he says, laughing. King is still very much into the occult — he talks about paranormal “active spots” in his Frisco house and is a proud member of the Church of Satan. But he wants neighbors to know he’s not sacrificing goats, worshiping the devil or recruiting junior Satanists next door. His brand of Satanism is similar to agnosticism and pacifism, he says. “People think it’s a religion, but it’s not: It’s a life philosophy about having respect for people who think differently than you do,” he says. “It would be nice if more people kept their beliefs to themselves instead of killing each other to convince each other what they believe is right. Belief should be a private matter.”?
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #56 on: September 18, 2016, 05:12:06 PM »
DAVE MUSTAINE Didn't 'Allow' KING DIAMOND To Perform With VOLBEAT, Claims HANK SHERMANN


Legendary MERCYFUL FATE axeman Hank Shermann, who played guitar for VOLBEAT on the latter band's 2012 U.S. tour, says that MEGADETH mainman Dave Mustaine did not allow King Diamond to perform with VOLBEAT during that year's Gigantour.

When the MEGADETH-headlined Gigantour hit King's adopted hometown of Dallas, Texas four years ago, VOLBEAT asked King, a fellow Dane, to join them on stage to sing the MERCYFUL FATE classic "Come To The Sabbath". "But, apparently, Dave Mustaine didn't want King to be onstage and do whatever Satanic lyrics, or whatever that was all about... So, King came to the concert and he was given the… he was told that, 'Hey, King, you're not allowed' from Mustaine, for some reason," Shermann told Alec Damiano of Vita In Musica (hear audio below).

VOLBEAT played the intro to "Come To The Sabbath" anyway, with King singing the lyrics from the audience.

"That was pretty funny," Shermann continued. "What that was all about, I really don't have a clue. I don't know if suddenly Mustaine had gotten into God, or, you know, for whatever reason. [Laughs] But that was pretty bizarre, you know, because back in the days, they were very good friends... MEGADETH were touring with [KING] DIAMOND in the '80s. So there's [been] a lot of changes in that band [MEGADETH]. But, you know, they're good guys... and I like them, and they have made some really cool records over time."

In the mid-2000s, the now-born-again Mustaine threatened to pull MEGADETH out of festivals that featured other metal bands named ROTTING CHRIST and DISSECTION over their professed Satanism. "I've never believed in singing about Satan and thinking he's cool, because he's not," he later told Decibel magazine. "As far as me playing with bands like that, I started thinking, 'You know what, Dave? You're a headliner. If you don't wanna play with people that make you uncomfortable, you don't have to.' Especially if they're singing about the confessed enemy of someone you believe in. I mean, what idiot gets onstage with their confessed enemy?'"

Mustaine appeared to soften his stance during a 2014 interview with the Israeli metal radio show "Met Al Metal". He stated about his past refusal to share the stage with certain bands: "It's just a personal preference that I had at the time. I've learned a lot more now. So if the opportunity came up to play with bands that were contrary to my personal, political, spiritual or any kind of moral values that I have, that's something between me and my relationship with God. I don't push that on anybody anymore. At the beginning, I didn't know and I wanted to play it safe. And I think that anybody who would judge me and say, 'Ah, you know what?! Dave made a huge mistake. He just joined a new club and he didn't know all the rules, so instead of breaking the rules, he said 'fuck you' to everybody.' That's not me, man. I like to do things right. So I played it safe, I learned a lot about it and I've opened my mind up to it."

"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline TheUnborn

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #57 on: December 08, 2016, 07:43:33 PM »
DAVE MUSTAINE Didn't 'Allow' KING DIAMOND To Perform With VOLBEAT, Claims HANK SHERMANN


Legendary MERCYFUL FATE axeman Hank Shermann, who played guitar for VOLBEAT on the latter band's 2012 U.S. tour, says that MEGADETH mainman Dave Mustaine did not allow King Diamond to perform with VOLBEAT during that year's Gigantour.

When the MEGADETH-headlined Gigantour hit King's adopted hometown of Dallas, Texas four years ago, VOLBEAT asked King, a fellow Dane, to join them on stage to sing the MERCYFUL FATE classic "Come To The Sabbath". "But, apparently, Dave Mustaine didn't want King to be onstage and do whatever Satanic lyrics, or whatever that was all about... So, King came to the concert and he was given the… he was told that, 'Hey, King, you're not allowed' from Mustaine, for some reason," Shermann told Alec Damiano of Vita In Musica (hear audio below).

VOLBEAT played the intro to "Come To The Sabbath" anyway, with King singing the lyrics from the audience.

"That was pretty funny," Shermann continued. "What that was all about, I really don't have a clue. I don't know if suddenly Mustaine had gotten into God, or, you know, for whatever reason. [Laughs] But that was pretty bizarre, you know, because back in the days, they were very good friends... MEGADETH were touring with [KING] DIAMOND in the '80s. So there's [been] a lot of changes in that band [MEGADETH]. But, you know, they're good guys... and I like them, and they have made some really cool records over time."

In the mid-2000s, the now-born-again Mustaine threatened to pull MEGADETH out of festivals that featured other metal bands named ROTTING CHRIST and DISSECTION over their professed Satanism. "I've never believed in singing about Satan and thinking he's cool, because he's not," he later told Decibel magazine. "As far as me playing with bands like that, I started thinking, 'You know what, Dave? You're a headliner. If you don't wanna play with people that make you uncomfortable, you don't have to.' Especially if they're singing about the confessed enemy of someone you believe in. I mean, what idiot gets onstage with their confessed enemy?'"

Mustaine appeared to soften his stance during a 2014 interview with the Israeli metal radio show "Met Al Metal". He stated about his past refusal to share the stage with certain bands: "It's just a personal preference that I had at the time. I've learned a lot more now. So if the opportunity came up to play with bands that were contrary to my personal, political, spiritual or any kind of moral values that I have, that's something between me and my relationship with God. I don't push that on anybody anymore. At the beginning, I didn't know and I wanted to play it safe. And I think that anybody who would judge me and say, 'Ah, you know what?! Dave made a huge mistake. He just joined a new club and he didn't know all the rules, so instead of breaking the rules, he said 'fuck you' to everybody.' That's not me, man. I like to do things right. So I played it safe, I learned a lot about it and I've opened my mind up to it."

This just sounds so weird.
Dave and King has known each other for decades. Seems like the religious views of Dave has caught the better of him.

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #58 on: December 09, 2016, 07:28:14 AM »
Someone told me recently that Dave pulled the same kind of shit with the Band "Rotting Christ" as he did not like the band name.  I guess calling your band Rotting Christ is not acceptable but calling your band Megadeth is perfectly fine.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2016, 07:05:08 AM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #59 on: January 10, 2017, 07:07:20 PM »
KING DIAMOND INTERVIEW: “I DATED ONE OF ANTON LAVEY’S DAUGHTERS”
Posted August 14, 2013 by Louise Brown

KD4
With our friends in Sweden and Belgium tantalising us with tales of KING DIAMOND‘s recent European Festival tour and the fact that ‘MELISSA’ is rarely off our stereo in the run up to its 30th Anniversary this Autumn, we knew that we wanted to interview the King of all evil. We sent GREG MOFFITT off for a dangerous meeting with the man himself to talk about his whole career from BLACK ROSE to BLOODSTOCK and most importantly the fate of MERCYFUL FATE…

How and when did you first get into music?
“I had a little transistor radio with a cassette deck built in and I used to listen to rock programmes in the afternoon and record some of the songs. Then I saved up from my allowance and eventually got a reel to reel tape machine, which was great because I could even record from the TV with that! Then in ’71 I got my first turntable, which I could plug into the reel to reel machine. That was stereo and that was a big deal! The first three vinyl albums I bought were Deep Purple’s ‘Fireball’, Black Sabbath’s ‘Master Of Reality’ and Jethro Tull’s ‘Aqualung’. Obviously I’d already heard ‘Paranoid’ and ‘Black Sabbath’ and ‘In Rock’ by Purple and all that stuff, but those were the first ones I actually bought.”

At what point did you actually start making music yourself?
“The urge to create sound myself came mainly from Jimmy Page’s guitar. I got the first Led Zeppelin album and I was like ‘Man, I would love to create that raw guitar sound!’ So I saved up again and got my first guitar, which was a lousy copy of an Explorer. When I got it home I was surprised that it didn’t sound like Jimmy Page. A family friend told me that I needed an amp – I was so ignorant about the whole thing! But he was an electronics engineer so he built one for me. It had a red ‘on’ and ‘off’ button and a black button that was always on as it created the distortion! The local library had some rehearsal rooms in the cellar and that’s where I started my first band with some friends. We called ourselves Brainstorm.”

You later joined local band Black Rose, which is where you began to develop a theatrical stage act and your unique vocal style. How did that come about?
“I only played guitar in Brainstorm and when that stopped I was looking for another band to play guitar in. Then I saw an ad at a grocery store that Black Rose were looking for a vocalist. So I went over and tried to sneak in as a guitarist/vocalist although I’d never sung before in my life. But they said ‘Nah, we don’t need a guitarist’. Their guitarist was a huge [Ritchie] Blackmore fanatic and he really had it down. So I just gave it a shot! The first song we did was [Deep Purple’s] ‘Space Truckin’’ and I just screamed and hoped they liked some of it and they did! As time went on, I learned not to scream so much and actually found that my stomach muscles could control airflow and I didn’t have to put crazy pressure on my throat; I would come home from rehearsals with no voice left! Later, a guy came up to me at a show and said ‘You should use your falsetto a bit more’. I had no idea what he meant. He said ‘When you sing high it sounds really good!’ so I put effort into trying to improve and you can hear the first steps on the Black Rose CD.”

Why did Black Rose split up?
“Black Rose actually stopped because the keyboard player sold his keyboards to get his girlfriend a new kitchen.”

You then joined another Danish band, the punk/metal outfit Brats, which is where you first met future Mercyful Fate guitarist Hank Shermann.
“Black Rose had started playing clubs in Copenhagen and one of the club managers – who also worked at a record store I went to – knew both me and Hank who was with Brats. Brats had released one album through CBS in Denmark. They’d been told that they should get a singer instead of the bass player singing. This is when I came into the picture. The style changed; it became a lot heavier. But when CBS heard our demos they said ‘You can’t do this! You need to go back to the style we signed you for!’ There was a split in the band right there, so Hank and I went the way of doing what we felt inside. The rest of the band tried to please the label in order to keep the deal, but it didn’t work.”

KD2It was around this time that you also met your other future Mercyful Fate band mates Michael Denner and Timi Hansen.
“Michael Denner had a three-piece band called Danger Zone with Timi Hansen on bass. Michael asked Hank if he and I could come over and help with a demo he was doing. The drummer wasn’t really what we were after, but otherwise it worked really well. This then turned into Mercyful Fate, the name coming from somebody’s girlfriend at the time, although we changed the spelling to make it kinda like Old English I guess.”

In 1982, Mercyful Fate made its first appearance on vinyl with ‘Black Funeral’, which was the first track on Ebony records’ second metal compilation ‘Metallic Storm’.
“That’s right, it was off to Hull to record in that tiny, tiny demo studio! We recorded two songs and one appeared on the album. After that came out, interest really grew and we were invited to go and do the BBC Friday Rock Show. We did three tracks and they got such a great response that they were re-broadcast and came to the attention of Rave On Records who wanted us to go down to Holland and record an EP. That was a real turning point.”

This was the self-titled EP, often referred to as ‘Nuns Have No Fun’, which also came out in ’82. How were the studio sessions for that?
“Me and the guitarists had all these harmonies worked out but there was no time to do most of them. It was the same with the guitar solos. ‘Corpse Without Soul’ had a long intro solo and we’d done two takes and still weren’t satisfied. But it was like ‘Whatever you do next, that goes on the album!’ Talk about pressure! When Roadrunner came in a little later and offered us eight days to record ‘Melissa’, we were like ‘Oh my god! Now we can do all the things we had planned last time!’ Then for ‘Don’t Break The Oath’ we got 12 days! But the EP did a lot of good for us. It was exported to a lot of different countries; I know Lars Ulrich and Brian Slagel [Metal Blade boss] heard it together at Brian’s place.”

Mercyful Fate were really beginning to gain some traction when the band suddenly split in 1985. What happened?
“We grew apart with the musical style. Hank was hanging out with a lotta people from the funk scene and he wanted to try and bring those influences into the band. I could listen to some of that, but I would never dream of playing it because I didn’t feel it inside. I’ve never done anything I couldn’t stand 100 per cent behind. I’d rather stop than do something I was forced to do by someone else. Plus I had already started writing stuff like ‘The Candle’, which was meant to be on the third Mercyful Fate album. But we did the right thing and followed our heart. And of course Hank has come back to being completely metal now!”

KD3At this point King Diamond the band was born. How did that happen?
“I approached Michael and Timi and said ‘I know you guys are on the same page with the music, so do you wanna continue this?’ They agreed right away and it was just a matter of finding some other musicians. Michael knew [drummer] Mikkey Dee who was living in Denmark at the time. We had a second guitarist lined up but he didn’t learn his parts. He was given several warnings – ‘If you don’t have this down, don’t bother coming to the studio’. But he was too much party, too little guitar, so we went into the studio as a four-piece. We’d done all the rhythm guitar tracks when we came across Andy [LaRocque]. He flew down to Copenhagen and we gave him ‘Dressed In White’ as a test song to see what he could come up with. Not just seeing if he could play, but testing his creativity right off the bat. He came in and laid down the solos that are actually on the album, so it was a pretty easy choice!”

If the first King Diamond album ‘Fatal Portrait’ was something of a transitional effort, the 1987 follow-up ‘Abigail’ heralded the arrival of the full-on King Diamond sound. Many people think it’s your best – do you agree?
“It was the first horror concept album from a metal band. For a lot of people, I guess that’s the album that made the biggest impression on them. After that, the albums were less hard-hitting because people knew our style and it was no longer a surprise. It was tough to match it, even though I think we have several times, and even surpassed it.”

Throughout the remainder of the decade, King Diamond enjoyed greater success with the albums ‘Them’ (1988), ‘Conspiracy’ (1989) and ‘The Eye’ (1990) than Mercyful Fate ever had. However, it’s also true to say that since disbanding, Mercyful Fate’s cult following continued to grow, so much so that you reformed for the release of 1993’s ‘In The Shadows’. This subsequently led to the release of a further four Mercyful Fate albums between 1994 and 1999, much more music than your original incarnation. How do you think they compare?

“Some are better than others, but there are often circumstances that keep you from achieving your goals. The last one, ‘9’, really hit the spot. There’s some really cool stuff there. ‘In The Shadows’ was also really good. ‘Time’ has good songs, but perhaps not consistently great. King Diamond is extremely theatrical and the songs are made to fit the story lines whereas Mercyful Fate is all individual songs, which can be harder to write because you don’t have as much time to explain things or get into bigger subjects. So, in a way, King Diamond is way more ‘Satanic’ than Merycful Fate will ever be, which might sound twisted, but the way I look at it ‘Satanic’ means LaVeyan, and the King Diamond horror songs are full of that life philosophy to the max.”

Will there ever be another Mercyful Fate album?
“There’s still room for both bands and I know Hank would love to do at least one more. He’s often said to me ‘Someday, we have to do the masterpiece!’ He doesn’t feel that we did the perfect one that should have followed ‘Don’t Break The Oath’. Well, I will never say never, but right now we are too busy with King Diamond.”

You mentioned Satanism. This is something you’ve caught a lot of flak for over the years, mainly because you’ve been misunderstood, and sometimes deliberately misrepresented.

“Satanism is a life philosophy; it has nothing to do with religion. Almost from day one, Christianity created evil ‘gods’ within itself. Satan is a Christian creation and was used to get power, especially in the past. How many people died in the Inquisition because of things that were made up? In general, you find misuse of power within religions. It’s a big part of all these wars today. They will not respect each other, and yet there has never been anyone on this Earth who could prove to the rest of humanity that theirs was the only true god. There might be people who feel that they personally have been given proof, but they have to understand that you can’t condemn everyone else. For me, I think it’s important to respect other people no matter what they believe. And I would never stand up and say ‘There are no gods!’ How would I prove that?”

KDYou also mentioned LaVey, as in the late Anton LaVey, former head of The Church Of Satan. By all accounts he was quite a character, whom you met more than once.

“I was very close to LaVey for a while – I dated one of his daughters actually. He was very serious about what he wrote in ‘The Satanic Bible’. He managed to put into a book what I had always felt. It’s not like I read the book and said ‘I wanna be like that!’ I recognised myself in his writing.

“Once I was invited to come to the Church and spend a whole night there. I spent two hours in the ritual chamber with him. It had been re-energising for over a year and a half and no one had been in there except him. There was a very high altar, a sleigh from a Russian Czar who had used it to drive his witches to and from court; there were original books – all kinds of stuff in there. There were 13 rooms and he could enter all these rooms in full secrecy. There was an iron maiden, which was actually a doorway from another room. It was an amazing experience. Instead of me just going in there and waiting for him to speak, I told him that I would like to speak first and tell him what I felt about the Satanic philosophy. I spoke for about 45 minutes after which he took his Baphomet sigil off and pressed it into my hand; it just said everything. Then we talked for about an hour and a half. He played keyboards for me that night – could’ve been music for a horror movie – and then suddenly he switched into ‘Wonderful Copenhagen’, looking over his shoulder with a big smirk on his face! With his humour and just the way he was, there was a very deep connection.

“I have a hand-written letter from him, which I always carry with me. It means so much to me as he never wrote anyone by hand, he would always dictate. I told Karla LaVey that I had this letter from her dad and she didn’t believe it, so I showed it to her and she started crying when she saw what he’d written to me. He said that everything was going according to plan. I know exactly what he’s talking about, but I will never tell anyone.”

What did you make of the murders and church burnings in the Scandinavian black metal scene of the early ‘90s? Many of the protagonists cited you as an influence.

“I don’t really know the background to it and I didn’t really follow who did what and what for. I don’t know what their murder rate was, but people get killed every day. Some things get blown out of proportion because of what you can pin on them. It was big for the people involved, but should it have been made into such a big news story? But it was because of the ‘Satanic’ thing. I actually wish that ‘The Satanic Bible’ had been called something else because people think it must be a book about some kind of religion. Supernatural happenings and ritual powers are mentioned in there, but nothing that constitutes a religion.”

In 2010, you were diagnosed with major heart problems and had to undergo triple-bypass surgery. It sounded horrendous, particularly the point at which you were technically dead for a couple of hours.

“It was some brutal shit! They had to puncture my lungs to have room to do the operation, so I literally had to learn to breathe again. It hurt like hell and I can’t even begin to describe it to you. Every breath was a fight from the beginning, so I had to learn to breathe in a different way. Everything sits differently in my chest now and I have a big braided metal rod down the middle – it looks like a piece of jewelry on the x-rays. There’s still pain and it’ll be here for a long time, but you can learn to live with it.

“For the first few months afterwards I was more concerned with thinking that I wasn’t really here. About three months went by before I stopped asking my wife if she could see me or feel when I touched her shoulder and stuff like that. There was so much horror in the wake-up process that must come out on the next album. Not writing about a hospital stay, but the moods and the feelings of struggling for every breath and the pain of being on a ventilator. If the doctors could have heard me I would have begged them to kill me. It was fuckin’ brutal and an eye-opening experience for sure. But if I lived in a house with 20 windows before, I live in one with 40 windows now. I see so much more and pay attention so much more.”

Ironically, you’re singing better than ever now.
“My voice is better than it’s ever been since I stopped smoking. The long and high notes are easier. If I’d known that before, I’d have stopped smoking a long time ago! I’m also on a very healthy diet and I walk five times a week. It’s all a matter of good fats / bad fats, good cholesterol / bad cholesterol. My wife’s basically become a nutritionist. She’ll sit and tell me ‘Oh that’s great, you can eat that’ and if she says it’s okay, I’ll eat it. She could kill me off in a second if she wanted to!”

KD5As the decades have gone by, your legacy with both Mercyful Fate and King Diamond has grown immensely in its importance. Not only do the likes of Metallica and Slayer openly acknowledge their debt to you, but today’s underground metal scene is awash with worshippers, some more blatant than others. Have you heard Portrait or In Solitude for example?

“It’s a huge honour of course. When Metallica invited me up to play the Mercyful Fate medley and said that without me there probably wouldn’t be a Metallica – are you kidding me? That’s practically the highest honour you can be given. I always wanted to do my own thing, and you don’t hear King Diamond and wonder if it’s really us or someone else. Others should not try to sound like us – why would anyone do that? That would be a tribute band, so why not do your own thing? I don’t think anyone has gone so far as to mimic what we do. I heard part of one of Portrait’s albums. I could hear what the singer was trying, but I don’t think he sounds like me. But whether it’s the show, the music or the lyrics, there are so many things that could trigger someone else artistically to go out and try their own thing.”

Downloading has torpedoed physical music sales across the board, but in terms of audience size, King Diamond seems to be thriving.
“We’re doing better today than we’ve ever done. We’ve been getting some nice headline spots and making sure we don’t let people down. The show we have now is really unique and even better than the one we had last year. The order of the songs is better, the lighting is better; the production has really been perfected. When we played Copenhagen, one of the biggest national newspapers gave us six out of six. They actually tell their journalists not to give six as there is no such thing as a perfect concert, but we got it. Not even Metallica did that! And there’s room for progress in the future. If I look at King Diamond as a painting on a big canvas, there are still plenty of empty spots to be filled out.”

You’ve looked death in the face and lived to fight another day – has it changed you at all?

“I’ve always felt that I’m gonna experience the presence of my parents and my cats when I’m not here anymore. That doesn’t give me enough for religious belief but I’m convinced, even if I can’t prove it. When they were rolling me in for my seven-and-a-half hour operation, I realised there wasn’t time to say goodbye, in case it was necessary. So I just said to my wife ‘I wanna come back to you, I’m not done yet, so I’ll do everything I can to survive, and you do everything you can to help me’. Who knows if any powers were at work, but we feel that they were. There’s a saying that your thoughts can move mountains and there’s something to that, but never take tomorrow for granted.”
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #60 on: January 26, 2017, 06:00:17 PM »
I have always wished that King would write a book about all of his experiences with ghosts. I just recently learned that Corey Taylor the singer I guess of Slipknot did write a book about his many experiences with ghosts and I have too say as incredible as many of Kings experiences are it seems that Corey has had many more plus his makes the ones King had seem almost like child's play!

Corey like King is an atheist but not a Satanist and explains what he thinks ghosts are and why they hang around him and can do things. It was very interesting stuff. Some differences between he and King is that he does not see these spirits as guardians or protectors nor as beings that can heal us nor does he believe you can use and control them via rituals.  I would love for King to do a book like that about his own experiences, practices and beliefs about these spirits or as he calls them powers .
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 12:52:25 PM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #61 on: May 06, 2017, 08:16:05 AM »
I notice the way King talks about Satanic Rituals is not much different than christian prayers.  He says how you must believe in external powers and spirits that belief is key as is respect for them in order to get results.

I am also curious as how he says these powers come to him and are his guardians and protectors for life.  How come the rest of us, the billions of others do not have these powers on our side and do not show up?

Many people say he is making these supernatural experiences up as a way to promote his music. I mean nobody else has backed these claims up including the guys from metallica that I have seen anyway and the guy from Kerrang said the time he spent the night there where Kings said something happened did not happen
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 02:18:24 PM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #63 on: May 10, 2017, 07:20:49 PM »
"I was begging the doctors to kill me": the confessions of King Diamond
Features / 20 Oct 2016 / by Metal Hammer
The Mercyful Fate frontman reveals all about Satan, hauntings and how it feels to be dead…

He's hung out with Anton LaVey, been dead for five hours and had supernatural experiences, but King Diamond doesn't scare easily…

What's the weirdest thing a fan has ever given to you?
“Once I was stood outside a theatre in Chicago and some guy came up to me with a gift in a black plastic bag. Inside was a severed horse’s leg with all the rotting flesh still on it. If the cops came right then, the tour would have been over!”

What was it like meeting Anton LaVey, the founder of the Church Of Satan?
“Very, very special. I got the chance to talk to him in the ritual chamber for almost two hours. Later that night, he took off the Baphomet symbol from his jacket and pressed it into my palm.”

What did you talk about?
“I asked him if I could speak first and tell him what I felt about Satanism, so I wouldn’t just be stood there nodding along to whatever he said! He started playing Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen on his keyboards, whilst looking over his shoulder smirking at me. It was almost like being in the Addams family.”

So what does the word 'Satan' actually mean to you?
“To me, Satanism is very much LaVey’s life philosophy. I wouldn’t call it a bible, because that suggests religion. The most important thing to me is for people to have respect for each other. It gives you the feeling to explore the powers of the unknown, which I have seen many times.”

What's the strangest thing you've ever seen?
“Well, the first thing I saw was a glass floating in thin air, and that just seemed to kick it all off. My old apartment in Copenhagen was so haunted. For a number of years, the weirdest, craziest things happened in there.”

Did bad things ever happen?
“To other people, yes. But not to me. Once I saw a girl being pulled by her hair around the apartment. Another time when Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield were there, a girl got locked in the bathroom and couldn’t get out, even though the door wasn’t actually locked. She came out in tears saying that something was in there growling at her, which is what many people said about that bathroom.”

Does the supernatural scare you?
“No, it has never scared me. I have a lot of respect for what I call ‘the powers’ or ‘them’ and I feel like I get that respect back. But it’s different for other people…”

What has been the darkest chapter of your life so far?
“In December 2010 I had a triple bypass surgery. It took about seven hours, and for five of those I was actually dead – I was not here. You start wondering, ‘Did I bring something with me from the other side?’”

How did it feel when you woke up?
“The most horrific experience of my life was waking up in hospital. I felt like I was in the video Metallica did for One and inside I was begging for them to kill me. I tried pulling the tubes out so they tied me up!”

Has it changed you?
“I feel more aware than ever before. It’s almost like looking out the windows in my house – now I feel like I have double the number of windows and can see so much more. Physically, I now have a thick, braided metal wire that runs underneath my skin holding my ribcage together.”

Have you ever taken drugs?
“I’ve never been into drugs, but when I was younger I smoked hash twice at a party and I got scared of my own voice. It wasn’t really for me.”

When was the last time you were starstruck?
“I got to say hi to Sammy Hagar recently. I arrived in my makeup on my way to get backstage. I saw him on the VIP balcony and just had to shake his hand!”
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #64 on: May 14, 2017, 09:51:37 PM »
How To Live Like A Satanist According To A Heavy Metal-April 2017

“It has been said, ‘the truth will make men free.’ The truth alone has never made anyone free. It is only doubt which will bring mental emancipation.”

–Anton Szandor LaVey

 The Western mindset, mostly influenced by Judeo-Christian beliefs, is characterized by a dual view of life consisting, basically, in a struggle of good versus evil forces. Satan, whose name in Hebrew means “the adversary” or “the accuser,” is most of the time associated to the forces of evil, wickedness, and the forbidden. Nonetheless, if we go beyond any religious belief, Satan as an archetype embodies the rebel, the one who accuses and questions social or religious dogmas, the misunderstood, or the pariah. So, it’s no surprise that many bands belonging to Heavy Metal, an openly defiant music genre, have embraced this figure as a symbol of their rebelliousness and constant questioning of established discourses.

In an interview with Cultura Colectiva, King Diamond, a central figure in the Heavy Metal scene, shared how the way LaVeyan Satanism –which follows the ideas of Anton LaVey’s Satanic Bible– has influenced his view on life and his creative process while writing music. Although in most of his band’s lyrics there aren’t direct mentions of Satanism, he has stated that as a philosophy of life, this current has enriched the storytelling of his albums.


Satanism-King-Diamond-
“Do not give your opinions or advice unless you are asked.”

According to Anton LaVey’s 11 principles in the Satanic Bible, a person must be aware of the fact that no one has the absolute truth about life. Satanism is not a religion per se, but an agnostic approach to understand humankind and learn from one’s own experience. King Diamond, a follower of LaVeyan Satanism, explains the following:

“I was following this lifestyle, even before reading LaVey’s Satanic Bible. Some people say ‘You can’t do this,’ ‘You can’t do that, ‘You can’t believe this.’ Why not? As long as you don’t hurt other people, why can’t you do certain things that maybe some people don’t consider “normal.” For me, the root of all evil comes from religion. I can’t say whether there’s no god, one god, or many gods, because I don’t know. There’s a lot of people saying they believe in the right god, and hate everybody else who disagrees with them and their rules. I don’t understand that. I think people should have much more respect for each other, no matter their beliefs.”

Satanism-King-Diamond-

It’s all about living and letting live. It doesn’t matter if your beliefs are not the same as others. What’s important is to respect others and be aware that your own reality can be different to others’ and there’s nothing wrong with that.


“Do not tell your troubles to others unless you are sure they want to hear them.”

The singer and composer said about his view on life:
“My friends believe in different things than me, I don’t even know what they all believe in because I don’t really care. They’re good people that’s what matters to me. They respect me, I respect them. But there’s too many people out there who kill others because they don’t believe in the same things. Why do we have to kill each other just because we believe in a different god? It’s a personal thing, so we should keep it a little bit more private.”

satanism-King-Diamond-

As the LaVeyan principle states, it is wise to have in mind that not everyone will agree with your own views, especially in such an ambiguous subject as religion. There is no point in arguing about it. Unless you are sure others want to know your opinion on these topics, you can say them out loud. Otherwise, it could be source of unnecessary conflict.


“Acknowledge the power of magic if you have employed it successfully…”

Besides being a musician, King Diamond is a storyteller, and each album narrates a horror story related to his life. To write his lyrics, the singer has been inspired by the horrors of humanity itself; however, he has openly recognized that many supernatural experiences he has lived through have influenced the stories behind each of his songs.

Satanism-King-Diamond-

“I use the things that I see in my life, including the occult experiences, which I change to fit the albums’ stories. One of the first things that I saw was a glass floating in the air, in my very own apartment, a very haunted apartment. Mercyful Fate [his other band] had just recorded its first demo and we were sitting, Kim Ruzz, my brother, and myself, waiting for the other guys to come and listen to it. While talking suddenly my brother’s glass rose two feet up in the air. None of us really believed it; we just looked at each other. It took a while before I said to them ‘I know you saw that,’ and they just nodded. I used that experience in the lyrics for the song ‘Welcome Princess of Hell.’ And that’s why I say that these powers of darkness are always welcome in my home. It’s as if the powers of the unknown came and said ‘Hey, we will stay with you and help you.’ That’s what I feel.”

“Do not complain about anything to which you need not subject yourself.”

This principle has to do with enjoying life and not worrying about those things we cannot change. Satanist ideology encourages people to be responsible for their own lives. So, when there are things we can change, instead of complaining about something being unfair, we must do what we can to change it.

After having a near-death experience in 2010, King Diamond has made the most of his life, and now that he is touring to commemorate the 30th anniversary of his band’s epic album Abigail, the musician feels better than ever.

Satanism-King-Diamond-

“I practically died and came back, I got a second chance. Now I don’t smoke, I eat healthy, I live healthy. I can sing Abigail’s songs even better. I asked the guys ‘why don’t we do a couple of shows?’ Why don’t we go to places we’ve never been before? We have a big production now. It’s the best show we’ve ever had. King Diamond, has never sounded this good. We have the best crew now. We have so much fun now. When I go onstage, I go to perform and have fun. Everything is so much better now.” 


Unlike popular beliefs state, Satanism is not a cult to a demonic deity, but an ideology that invites us to take our lives on our own hands and make the most of it without hurting others or letting ourselves be hurt. Through his music and his life’s philosophy, King Diamond proves it’s all about having passion for life, respecting others, and being open to new experiences, even if we can’t explain them.
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #65 on: May 14, 2017, 09:53:31 PM »
Danish Rocker King Diamond Puts On His Horrific Heavy Metal Face
August 27, 1987|by GARY R. BLOCKUS, The Morning Call
Today's lesson in music comes courtesy of Vincent Price and Boris Karloff. Call it the "Revenge of Horror" or "Alice Cooper's Last Stand." More appropriately, call it "The King comes toAllentown." No, it's not Elvis Presley, though the way King Diamond works his magical mystery, er, horror, tour, who can say?

King Diamond, that royal knave from Denmark, visits the Music Hall in the Queen City tonight. What King Diamond does is present a blend of heavy metal, classical rock and - you guessed it - horror, that hasn't been seen since . . . since . . . since .

he Danish singer and front man for the group that bears his name, King Diamond proclaims his LP, "Abigail" (on the independent Roadracer label), the very first horror metal album in history. Judging by King's vocals, which range from baritone to falsetto soprano, he's got that quite right.

Actually, King's voice isn't all that bad, and its range certainly makes for some strange noises. And "Abigail" is being touted by heavy metal magazines like Kerrang! as the best concept album since Pink Floyd's "The Wall."

What makes King so hideous to so many adults is his outrageous make-up (sorry Kiss fans, you'll be disappointed) and his avowed satanic philosophies. That's right Tipper Gore, this guy's for you.

"I'm not trying to change it," King said of his music in a recent telephone interview from Texas. King's previous band, Mercyful Fate, played music steeped in satanic references.

"I'm trying to make sure people understand what we're doing," he continued, speaking with a very thick Danish accent. "A lot of people say, 'We don't want that,' because they're afraid. What we're talking about is the occult, the powers of the unknown. I believe in them very strongly because I've had experiences."

(Shirley MacLaine, get off the line! This is supposed to be King Diamond talking.)

"This new album (Abigail) is one fiction story," King explained. "Earlier, I took personal experiences and mixed them with fantasy. People misunderstood that - a lot."

There's no misunderstanding "Abigail," a story about a young man and woman, and their never-born little girl, Abigail. King Diamond mixes in numerology (the young man is 27, the woman 18 - both add up to nine) and other occult references just to keep your mind on the lyrics.

Numerology aside, King Diamond is honing his own special edge on the grindstone of heavy metal. The lyrics and the music sound like Alice Cooper at times, which is purely intentional. "He's my favorite entertainer," the singer said. "He's been that and still is. I was interested in music since I was 14-years-old. What really got me started was the first Led Zeppelin album . . . absolutely."

Music pried the young man away from another favorite past time - soccer. King Diamond was considered one of the best under-18 players in Denmark before deciding to trade the sunlight for the floodlights and moonlight of rock concerts.

King is extremely excited about his group - which includes Andy LaRocque on lead guitar; Mickey Dee on drums; Timi G. Hansen on bass and the newest member, Michael Denner, on guitar - and current tour, which features a promising stage show that ranks on a par with Dio, only on a smaller, more eerie scale.

"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #66 on: May 26, 2017, 01:02:10 PM »
For those interested Mind over Metal did a podcast reviewing King Diamonds "Them".  Interesting they hint at what fans have said for years that King is warning people not to mess with these powers in his songs and storylines as they are evil and no good at all can come from dealing with these spirits and powers.  He clearly stands behind the Satanic Philosophy but when it comes to the forces he calls Satan he clearly see's them as dangerous and evil most likely due to his own bad experiences with them that he has talked about.  Ironically King sounds almost christian like in that warning of dealing with all supernatural occult powers

https://mindovermetal.podbean.com/
« Last Edit: May 26, 2017, 02:47:37 PM by SatanKing »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond

Offline TheUnborn

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #67 on: October 28, 2017, 11:43:53 PM »
For those interested Mind over Metal did a podcast reviewing King Diamonds "Them".  Interesting they hint at what fans have said for years that King is warning people not to mess with these powers in his songs and storylines as they are evil and no good at all can come from dealing with these spirits and powers.  He clearly stands behind the Satanic Philosophy but when it comes to the forces he calls Satan he clearly see's them as dangerous and evil most likely due to his own bad experiences with them that he has talked about.  Ironically King sounds almost christian like in that warning of dealing with all supernatural occult powers

https://mindovermetal.podbean.com/

 :king: :king:

Offline SatanKing

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Re: Interesting King Diamond Interview from 1986
« Reply #68 on: October 29, 2017, 07:25:44 AM »
"Satanism is about the Powers/Spirits of Darkness/Unknown" - King Diamond